Video 25 Jun 20 notes

remnantsofwhatoncewas:

Kenneth Anger + Diamanda Galás ”Sono L’Antichristo”

What a  combo…

Photo 25 Jun 2,029 notes wired:

newsweek:

fastcompany:

It’s called a lilac chaser. You’ve seen it before. It’s an optical illusion with a small black cross in the middle, encircled by twelve blurry lilac-colored dots. A green dot animates over the lilacs as though counting the time on a futuristic clock. Stare at the cross long enough and the lilacs disappear, one by one. But the moment you get distracted and look away, the lilacs come back.
The black cross is the work you do. The lilacs are all the things ancillary to your work. They’re the small choices you’ve made around your black cross: the time you wake up, the tools you use, what you have for breakfast, when you check your email, and so on. They’re the various aspects of a daily routine—things that, when fixed in place, disappear with the passage of time.
How your habits become productivity-draining distractions

Whoa.

Deep thoughts and optical illusions for your Monday.

Follow the red dots around and you will see that there is not green dot at all - just an absence of pink…

wired:

newsweek:

fastcompany:

It’s called a lilac chaser. You’ve seen it before. It’s an optical illusion with a small black cross in the middle, encircled by twelve blurry lilac-colored dots. A green dot animates over the lilacs as though counting the time on a futuristic clock. Stare at the cross long enough and the lilacs disappear, one by one. But the moment you get distracted and look away, the lilacs come back.

The black cross is the work you do. The lilacs are all the things ancillary to your work. They’re the small choices you’ve made around your black cross: the time you wake up, the tools you use, what you have for breakfast, when you check your email, and so on. They’re the various aspects of a daily routine—things that, when fixed in place, disappear with the passage of time.

How your habits become productivity-draining distractions

Whoa.

Deep thoughts and optical illusions for your Monday.

Follow the red dots around and you will see that there is not green dot at all - just an absence of pink…

via WIRED.
Video 25 Jun 6,232 notes

wnycradiolab:

kateoplis:

Deserts from Space

Wow.

I love arial airial (Finally Googled it) aerial Art…

via Radiolab.
Photo 25 Jun 2,713 notes sfmoma:

sanfranciscomagazine:

Don’t drop the Rothko (Winni Wintermeyer).

Read the fascinating story about our art move here. 

The only artist I have ever named a cat after…

sfmoma:

sanfranciscomagazine:

Don’t drop the Rothko (Winni Wintermeyer).

Read the fascinating story about our art move here

The only artist I have ever named a cat after…

via SFMOMA.
Photo 25 Jun 24 notes la-journee:

Enzo Mari -a machine for producing volumes through light, 1967

la-journee:

Enzo Mari -a machine for producing volumes through light, 1967

(Source: jonyorkblog.com)

Video 25 Jun 1,875 notes

collegehumor:

Dildo Helicopter Interrupts Political Speech [Click to watch]

The only thing that stops a bad guy with a dildo helicopter is a good guy with a willingness to swat a dildo helicopter.

Photo 25 Jun 123 notes designsbyfranklloydwright:

Frank LLoyd Wright’s Taliesin West (1937), Scottsdale, Arizona

designsbyfranklloydwright:

Frank LLoyd Wright’s Taliesin West (1937), Scottsdale, Arizona

(Source: )

via .
Photo 25 Jun 197 notes wired:

The truth about photographs is that they are not truthful. Yet, photography remains a medium that we think of, still, as being close to reality. That’s why when artists such as Marina Gadonneix come along, who aggressively blur the lines between reality and make-believe, we sit up and take note.
“I am interested in the interstice between fiction and reality,” says Gadonneix, a French photographer who creates fictional scenes of catastrophe, drama and terror from real places.
From fire-training centers (The House That Burns Everyday) to police forensic schools (Crime Scenes), and from military installations and research laboratories (Playground Disorder) to empty TV studios (Remote Control), Gadonneix searches out places “we build in order to face reality.”
Her work shouldn’t be a hard sell — they are eye-catching and dramatic. But if any other artist proclaimed, as she does, “My work looks at the simulation of reality, through the reality of simulation,” they would be promptly filed in the “bullshit artspeak” folder. Not Gadonneix. This is a very literal description of her work. She makes photographs in places where real acts of simulation occur.
“They are very rationalized places, where scientists and specialists explore our fantasies or our nightmares,” she says. “The idea that from the very objective comes the alien has always fascinated me.”
[MORE]

wired:

The truth about photographs is that they are not truthful. Yet, photography remains a medium that we think of, still, as being close to reality. That’s why when artists such as Marina Gadonneix come along, who aggressively blur the lines between reality and make-believe, we sit up and take note.

“I am interested in the interstice between fiction and reality,” says Gadonneix, a French photographer who creates fictional scenes of catastrophe, drama and terror from real places.

From fire-training centers (The House That Burns Everyday) to police forensic schools (Crime Scenes), and from military installations and research laboratories (Playground Disorder) to empty TV studios (Remote Control), Gadonneix searches out places “we build in order to face reality.”

Her work shouldn’t be a hard sell — they are eye-catching and dramatic. But if any other artist proclaimed, as she does, “My work looks at the simulation of reality, through the reality of simulation,” they would be promptly filed in the “bullshit artspeak” folder. Not Gadonneix. This is a very literal description of her work. She makes photographs in places where real acts of simulation occur.

“They are very rationalized places, where scientists and specialists explore our fantasies or our nightmares,” she says. “The idea that from the very objective comes the alien has always fascinated me.”

[MORE]

via WIRED.
Photo 19 Jun 4 notes noxe:

“Same old me, same old fuckin’ problems…”

Slightly backwards, but you get the idea….

noxe:

“Same old me, same old fuckin’ problems…”

Slightly backwards, but you get the idea….

via NOXE.
Text 19 Jun Art

There are only two responses to art: “I like it” or “I don’t like it” - everything else is in the hands of others. Don’t fool yourself into thinking you have any objective viewpoint. Art is in the eye of the beholder….


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